Norsk Folkedans Stemne 2017 Update

(Stemne dates will be August 18, 19, 20 this year)

Hi everyone,

Several early Christmas presents have arrived for Norsk Folkedans Stemne.

This morning Marit Kvamen wrote: Bul Ervingen would like to attend your stemne in August 2017.

We do not know yet how many dancers and musicans who have the opportunity to go, but we will try to find out during January, but we hope we can manage to send at least 15 persons.

They will probably be between 20-40 years old, perhaps a few couples that are older. None of them are smokers, and we will make sure that the group will have both dancers/instructors, musicans and singers.

The picture (above) was taken this year, at a festival in Bergen. Hopefully some of the persons in this picture will have the chance to go.

We hope this is good enough for now, and we will send you more information as soon as we can!

Best regards

Marit Kvamen
Bul Ervingen

As you can see, the group has many younger members which may be an inspiration to our younger folkdance groups in the area.

I am especially excited because Bergen is a sister city to Seattle. We will be working with the Seattle-Bergen Sister City Association to provide a special experience for the group. Perhaps meeting with our mayor and visiting our beautiful city hall.

The other present is Ingrid Hamberg and her new husband, David, will be in the Seattle area around the time of Norsk Folkedans Stemne. Ingrid's sister, Sonya, is getting married! You may remember Sonya for her art work for Norsk Folkedans Stemne back in 2007 and before. Ingrid has been honing her fiddle skills the last few years, too, while living in Norway. It will be wonderful to see Ingrid and David on what will be very close to their first wedding anniversary!

Fort Worden is still the location for Norsk Folkedans Stemne--deposits have been put down. The camping reservation system has changed and the camping areas around the Fort have now joined with the rest of the park reservations. http://fortworden.org/stay-here/camping/ Reserving a space won't open up until around the first of year again. If you usually camp, we recommend you make your own reservations as some attendees already have (spaces 58 and 51 if you are interested in being close by). If you are usually a camping single person you might want to share your space with another tent to save some money. The spaces look as if they can accommodate several tents.

We have been able to secure limited housing in the Generals and a Loft so we have space for about 35 people some of which will need to be used by the Norwegians. We are still in transition for determining costs due to the many differences in housing between the Treacy Levine Center and Fort Worden.

Here is the link to take a view of the website http://fortworden.org

Am hoping the photos from Norsk Folkedans Stemne 2016 will soon be loaded. (Photo site is now loaded: https://flickr.com/photos/folkedans/albums)

Am also planning on mailing the CDs, DVDs, and extra shirts next week after getting through Christmas.

A little bit about Ervingen from Wikipedia translated by Lori Ann Reinhall, president of Seattle-Bergen Sister City Association:

Ervingen (The Heir) is a musical drama (literally a “sing-play”) by Ivar Aasen. In theater history, the piece is regarded as the first play to be have been performed in the New Norwegian (nynorsk) language. For the first time, all characters in the play with only one exception speak in country dialect (landsmål). Aasen wrote the greater part of the play during the winter of 1855.

It was performed for the first time at the Christiania (Oslo) Norwegian Theater on April 28th of the same year. Ivar Aasen attended the rehearsals for the play and sang the songs for the conductor Paoli Sperati, who composed the music. The Heir was the first play produced by The Norwegian Theater on the 2nd of January 1913 in Kristiansand.

Several well-known songs by Aasen are found in The Heir, including, “Here is the land that pleases me most” and “They’ll always complain and moan.” («Her er det Land, som hugar meg best» og «Dei vil alltid klaga og kyta».)

Ivar Aasen is known as the father of nynorsk and for his work with Norwegian dialects. The heir is about an emigrant to America who returns to Norway to claim his inheritance.

 


What is a Norsk Folkedans Stemne (nynorsk): In Norway, a stemne is a gathering of folk dancers and musicians sharing their knowledge of dances and music. Now in our fourth decade, we carry on this living tradition with select group of dance and music instructors. Norwegian folkdance groups from Canada, the United States, and Norway share this wonderful opportunity to dance favorites, learn new dances and music, and information.

Come and enjoy the immersion for all levels of dancers from beginning to advanced into all the types of Norwegian folkdancing and music from the bygdedansar Skjåkspringleik, Vågåspringleik, and Innherredspols; runddansar including Masurka fra Bingen, reinlendar; songdansar such as Flauman går inspired by Norway’s struggle for independence; and turdansar og rekkedansar (figure dances and longways dances) such as rils, Fandango from Austlandet and Storelvdal. Our website will have updates as to the dances being taught.

 


Norsk Folkedans Stemne is an independent federal and state nonprofit corporation. We accept donations large and small to continue our purposes to teach, share, and promote understanding of Norwegian folk dances, music, songs, heritage, and culture through our annual gathering of Norwegian folk dancing groups from the United States, Canada, and Norway. All monetary donations are tax deductible in the United States.


 

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